Othello act 4 scene 4. OTHELLO, Act 4, Scene 1 2018-12-23

Othello act 4 scene 4 Rating: 8,1/10 194 reviews

SparkNotes: Othello: Act IV, scenes ii

othello act 4 scene 4

Just her mention of Cassio sends him into an unreasonable rage; every little thing he regards with suspicion, even if he has no cause. But if she has no jewels to return, then Roderigo will take it out on Iago. In the final scene, Othello does abruptly decide that he has been deceived all along by Iago, but not because he is confronted by compelling proof. Othello says she can cry crocodile tears full of falsehood and he won't care, as she changes faces so easily. She is so desperate she asks for Iago's help. Although one of his greatest fears regarding Desdemona's alleged infidelity was that it would blacken his name and reputation, the irony is that Othello is doing that himself; in striking Desdemona out of unreasonable cruelty, he besmirches his own good name.

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SparkNotes: Othello: Act IV, scenes ii

othello act 4 scene 4

Continuate, unbroken by other business. Emilia Emilia is presented as understanding; she and Desdemona have a bond especially when it comes to the trouble of their husbands. Given what we have seen of Iago so far, it is pretty safe to assume that Iago delivered the jewels to himself rather than Desdemona. Inevitably, she will loose the man she loves and her own life due a complete lie. He would rather have Roderigo stay so that he can continue to slowly steal all of his money.

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Othello Act 4, Scene 2 Summary

othello act 4 scene 4

Desdemona responds that she does not want to learn how to emulate bad deeds, but instead how to avoid them. Iago, of course, is there to hush this suspicion, but still, Emilia and Desdemona know that something is awry, but do not know what to do about it. Othello has convinced himself that Desdemona is cunning in her harlotry, and it's no surprise she wouldn't be found out, even by her woman friend. She is not trying to fight it; she seems like a totally different woman than the one who stood up to her father and the Venetian nobles in defense of Othello. Iago quiets him by making him believe that if he kills Cassio, then he will win Desdemona; Roderigo decides to go along with it, but Iago is coming dangerously close to being revealed. The others chatted as they waited for him. Either way, it is clear Othello doesn't think much of her or her testimony.

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Read Modern Translation of Othello: Act 4, Scene 1

othello act 4 scene 4

Constantly Roderigo is smooth-talked by Iago; every doubt Roderigo has Iago always has a comeback that is able to convince Roderigo to do what Iago wants. Men should beware or women will learn from how they are abused to abuse them. Crusadoes, a Portuguese coin bearing a cross. I do but say what she is. How is it with you, my most fair Bianca? Apparently, finding objective proof has gone out the window. See, your wife's with him.

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Othello Act 4 Scene 2 by Anestasia Raposo on Prezi

othello act 4 scene 4

O, the world hath not a sweeter creature! Emilia, the more practical one, thinks that it is not too big a price for a small act; Desdemona is too good, and too devout, to say that she would do so. As doth the raven o'er the infected house, Boding to all he had my handkerchief. She was brought up so gently that she can't make sense of his abuse. — Concerning this, sir,—O well-painted passion! When Cassio returns, Iago questions him about his relationship with Bianca, knowing that Othello will think that they are talking about Desdemona. At this point Desdemona is perplexed by Othello and makes the grave mistake of trying to change the path of their conversation by pressing Othello about Cassio.

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Read Modern Translation of Othello: Act 4, Scene 3

othello act 4 scene 4

He knelt down beside Othello and took his face gently in his hands. Yet again, Iago convinces him that the plan will work soon and together they plan to kill Cassio. Iago blatantly lies and blames the generals aggressiveness on his job. Sir, she can turn, and turn, and leave again, and turn again. She had a song about a willow, an old song, it was, and she died singing it.

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Othello Act 4, scene 3 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

othello act 4 scene 4

Or have peevish outbursts of jealousy, restricting us? Iago saw an opportunity where he himself does not need to kill Cassio. And she can weep, Sir, weep. I was a fine fool to take it. The characters in a tragedy are merely a means of driving the story; and the plot, is the chief focus of tragedy. Do ye triumph, Roman, do you triumph? Or did the letters work upon his blood, And new-create this fault? He threw the letter down and came up to Desdemona. His belief that she has given it away means the break in their love, the giving away of her body. The worser that you give me the addition Whose want even kills me.

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Read Modern Translation of Othello: Act 4, Scene 1

othello act 4 scene 4

But it is less easy for him to think about killing Desdemona. He shook his finger at Desdemona. Othello falls into a trance of rage, and Iago decides to hammer home his false ideas about his wife. Somehow Roderigo is appeased when Iago promises he'll explain it all later. I like the work well: ere it be demanded-- As like enough it will--I'ld have it copied: 190 Take it, and do't; and leave me for this time.


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Othello Act IV Summary and Analysis

othello act 4 scene 4

As he goes on he insults her by calling her a whore and a prostitute and then throws money at her. She dismisses Emila and goes to bed. The word originally meant a trustee, to whom property was devised. Have you not hurt your head? Othello continues to condemn Desdemona despite assurances from both Emilila and Desdemona herself that she is faithful and honest. A likely story that you found it in your bedroom and not know who left it there. I must take out the work? I pray you, bring me on the way a little, And say if I shall see you soon at night. To atone them, for the love I bear to Cassio.

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