Living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary. Book Review: Living Downstream « Sandra Steingraber 2019-01-01

Living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary Rating: 5,2/10 1723 reviews

Living Downstream notes on the text

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

I enjoy her casual writing style, and was hoping the science-y part would be easier to follow than most, but it is not at all. With a very polished narrative, the author fuses her personal bout with cancer with scientific data on cancer, carcinogens, and the environment. He was born in a ship On the breast of the river of Time. What struck Steingraber was the volume of science research that focused on genetic mutations as a cause for cancer. The risks are higher now and they were 40 years ago, and this is because of chemical introduction since the world wars. Among the things I really appreciated about this book were how Steingraber organized her inquiry by routes of exposure: water, air, earth, etc. The showing was sponsored by the Breast Cancer Fund and Pesticide Action Network North America, two organizations that like to scare me out of my complacency.

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Living Downstream: Steingraber Documentary Puts Moral Imperative on Banning Cancer

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

Living Downstream was a very dense book, and reading it was sometimes quite depressing. Just before her sentencing, Dr. In recent years, starting in the 1990s, most of the ground water was contaminated, so clean up became more and more important. But they still are looking for the roots of cancer, with hereditary cancers being an rare exception. There seemed to be a general consensus that this book punches the reader with facts.

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Sandra Steingraber

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

Starting in 1908 Chicago started to pour chlorine into waste water before sending it downstream. They have always soothed me, I look for signs of snow. I love that there is a large chunk of the book dedicated to the sources that she used to write this book - it gives her credibility. It is only early evening, but the fields are already dark, a patchwork of lights quilted over and across them. It was then that water started to become as regulated as food, with the tolerable levels of chemicals that could not be passed to be considered safe.

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Sandra Steingraber

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

It seems deeper, wider, more present. On October 29, 2014 while participating in the campaign, called We Are Seneca Lake, Steingraber was arrested again with nine other protestors at the gates of Crestwood Midstream formerly Inergy for trespassing and blocking a chemical truck, which resulted in an additional charge of disorderly conduct. Sandra Steingrabers brave, clear, and careful voice is certain to break the paralyzing silence on this subject that persists more than three decades after Rachel Carsons great early warning. I first saw the documentary based on this book because my friend had worked as part of the film's outreach team. Contrary to the public perception that so much risk of cancer is due to lifestyle choice i. She worked for several years as a field researcher, eventually earning her doctorate in biology from the. Reflection: This chapter was shorter like a few of the others.

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Living Downstream: A Scientist's Personal Investigation of Cancer and the Environment by Sandra Steingraber

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

” 50 Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma incidence 51 “Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma has shot up-- approximately tripling in incidence since 1950. The author's well-documented account should help to rectify this disturbing and dangerous situation. It makes one wonder then is industrial advancement really worth it? ” Devra Davis, cancer research study was based on the year people were born and the year the c was diagnosed “Davis found that cancer not tied to smoking has increased steadily down the generations. I look at the brown, spiny flowers and then out the window at the city I live in. Overall, a bit of a downer to read we're all poisoned and many of us will die because of it , but a fascinating read.

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Sandra Steingraber

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

Mixed in with all of the scientific talk about cancer cells, carcinogens, and pollutants are stories of the author's personal battle with cancer, the struggles of those in her home town who fought unsuccessfully for someone to recognize the high rate of cancer among residents, and pers I highly recommend this book to anyone who loved Rachel Carson's Silent Spring. The information she relays is kind of scary, but it's good for us to get a wake up call. Here are some salient sometimes shocking, outrageous, infuriating, thought-provoking bits from the book: Pg. Almost none of us who live here has ever seen prairie--” “the aspect of the landscape that spawns tornadoes. Because they point out something very, very telling about the link between the lives we live and the cancers we get. I also like her alternating personal narrative she is a bladder-cancer survivor, a native of Illinois, a graduate student, a researcher--we find out lots of things with the cold hard facts and sometimes the fuzzy facts of cancer research and regulation of chemicals.

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Living Downstream: Steingraber Documentary Puts Moral Imperative on Banning Cancer

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

After reading the last page, I closed the book feeling angry about the U. Sandra Steingraber was diagnosed with bladder cancer as a young adult. Everyone could take the most appropriate measures to lead a healthy lifestyle choosing to eat healthily and workout however if you are living in a country that supports economic gain over environmental health, you are just as good as dead. By no means should we be building more incinerators in our agricultural producing states or dumping 250 million tons of toxic waste below the fields that are feeding our families. And different organs show 209 chemical variants, with different parts of the body having different levels of chemicals and different chemicals. I've met science majors and creative writing majors in this class, but I couldn't point out one person I know to be an English major.

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Living Downstream notes on the text

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

The premiere was sold out. What really interested me in making the film was Sandra's unique perspective-the blend of the personal and the scientific. Childhood obesity may contribute to breast cancer risk by hastening the onset of puberty: as a group, chubbier girls develop breasts at younger ages than leaner girls; early sexual maturation is a known risk factor for adult breast cancers. First described was the natural layout with vast ecosystems or both plant and aquatic life. The E-mail message field is required. Vocab: Tolerances: Maximum permissible level of pesticide residue allowed in food. The author then goes into talking about the different levels that water must reach in parts per billion.

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Sandra Steingraber

living downstream sandra steingraber chapter summary

Ingeniously structured and bursting at the seams with research. Reflection: This chapter was a bit misleading. For Steingraber, there had to be more than just genetics. Dump sites are a large problem as well, with them polluting the air, rivers, and ground waters. The lifestyles of children have not changed much in 50 years; they do not smoke, drink alcohol, or hold stressful jobs. An obsession with genes and heredity is one.

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